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asylum-art:

Oksana Badrak

Oksana Badrak is an extremely talented illustrator and concept artist from Moscow, Russia. She creates dreamy pop/kitsch imagery using mixed-media – this approach consists of a rich combination of digital technology with meticulously hand painted elements. The resulting surreal imagery presents a fantastical visual experience made from various amalgamations of graphic fiction and tightly rendered reality. Her work’s inspired from everything from Asian supermarkets to the Southern California desert. This creates a very distinctive style; it fuses an enticing and balanced landscape of pop-culture icons with organic world depictions.

asylum-art:

Graziano Locatelli

The works all have the name of a street or a street that has been part of the life of Locatelli and want to be an element of profound innovation in contemporary art. This is how the walls torn, shattered sculptures in which the memory bully comes across space and time, giving voice to a neurosis and an emotion tied to the objects that have left deep scars in the life of the artist. The tiles vintage crumbling and animate in a three-dimensional movement, are the chosen element to emphasize the power and vehemence that the memories have in our lives.  A broken wall in a house “uninhabited” that wants to tell his story.  Hence the title of the exhibition “Disabitare” as an evocation of a time that was where the object that has been forgotten its presence screams coming out of the walls, the walls, from our memories. An attempt, therefore, “Re-inhabiting” to Locatelli, an attempt to revive a past that would not be forgotten, but that is hard to forget.

asylum-art:

Joshua Suda: Amasing Hyper Realistic Paintings

The hyper-realistic oil paintings of Joshua Suda will make you question whether you’re looking at a painting or a photograph as he recreates the features of the human face with stunning accuracy. Going beyond replicating life, many of Suda’s pieces also have elements of surrealism. Bizarre compositions, mixed with Suda’s impressive attention to detail, result in uncanny contortions of the human face. He often breaks the fourth wall, playing with the foreground and background to make it appear that the subject is bursting through the surface of the piece. In other works, he paints to mimic other media, replicating the detail of everything from pencil drawings to old photographs and contrasting them with how the subjects might appear to the human eye:, , , , , .

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